Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
Rho Ophiuchus by CapturingTheNight Rho Ophiuchus by CapturingTheNight
:icondonotuseplz::iconmyartplz: Greg Gibbs. You may not use, replicate, manipulate, or modify this image without my permission. All Rights Reserved.

Been wanting to image this beautiful section of sky for a while now. Managed to do a bit of time on it this morning between the moon setting and the sun coming up.

This is the Rho Ophiuchus complex in the constellations of Scorpius and Ophiuchus. The faint red nebulosity on the right hand side of this image is an emission nebula (RCW129). The orange/yellow cloud is a dark nebula (IC4606). The colour comes from the light from the star Antares shining through it. Antares is one of the brightest stars in the night sky. Above and slightly to the left of Antares is The Cats Eye Cluster (M4). The faint red nebulosity to the left of M4 is Sh2-9 and Ced130. The three blue/green nebulas below that surrounding the dark brown nebula (B42) are from left to right IC 5604, IC 4603 and IC 4605.

I will certainly be revisiting this section of sky soon to put some proper time into imaging it to remove some more of the noise in this image. This is just a quicky.

6/03/2012
4am
Canon 1000D
Tamron 90mm Macro F/2.8 Lens
NEQ6 Pro Goto Telescope Mount (unguided)
Aperture F/4
ISO 800
Exposures 20 x 2 minutes (40 minutes total)
Dark Frames 10 x 2 minutes
Images stacked in Deep Sky Stacker
Final Processing in PS CS3
Add a Comment:
 
:iconsilverfernn:
silverfernn Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
glorious! :faint: :boogie:

googling "Rho Ophiuchus" does not tell me where in the night sky I could "imagine" seeing this object. For example, it looks as if it is part of the dark, ominously bulging section of the milky way band, close to the southern cross around midnight. ... Where is it really - and do you have a tip for a star atlas on the internet?
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you very much :D A good online sky map is here [link] . Just enter your latitude and longitude and press go. You are probably better off searching for Antares which is the bright star in this image and it is part of the constellation Scorpius. It is one of the few stars that appears visably red/yellow to the unaided eye. To get a wider view of where to look, check out [link] Antares is the yellow star at the bottom of the frame. And then to get an even wider view (in relation to the southern cross) check out [link] The southern cross is above the water tank, then to the left is alpha and beta centauri (or the pointers) and keep travelling to the left to get to the central bulge of the Milky Way and just above that is Antares.
Reply
:iconsilverfernn:
silverfernn Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I kept this reply in my stack without responding to it - because I thought I'd loose it if I reply... Now, I discovered the tick box "remove after reply" ...

Thank you soo much for your detailed answer!
I keep going back to it again and again whilst star grazing and while researching on the net.

On a different subject:
you once wrote you took a picture while your camera was put directly on the Orion Atlas mount - without a telescope.
Now, I am facing financial limitations... can't afford both, a mount and an 8" reflector in one go.
So I was thinking, because you mentioned that somewhere (which pic was it, by the way?), to buy the proper mount, first (Orion's Sirius - or "HEQ5") and let it do the tracking for my naked camera and longtime exposures. Until I can afford the scope.

Would that work? And if so - how?
I am doing research and posting on forums (cloudynights.com) but so far no definitive no or yes to be had.

(I purposefully post this as a comment on your photo instead of in a private message because I always learn from reading the comments and assume so do others...)

Cheers across the ditch!
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Oh and Ice In Space has classifieds for second hand equipment so you might be able to find a good second hand mount for a fraction of the price of new when someone upgrades to bigger and better equipment. They come up from time to time......
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
My pleasure :D The mount is the most important aspect of astrophotography. Most people think that all you need is a great telescope to take photos like mine and it can sit on any old mount. It is exactly the opposite. A cheap mount + great telescope = poor photos. A cheap telescope + great mount = great photos. If I was you and wanted to start out then yes you are much better off getting the best mount you can afford first. Essentially all you are doing by adding a telescope is increasing the focal length so that you can "zoom" in on objects. Get a great mount and you will have years of pleasure photographing widefield images while you save up for a telescope if you decide to take that next step. I can not remember exactly which image I gave this advice before but the following links are all of my pictures done with just a mount and a standard camera and lens. [link] [link] [link] [link] [link] [link] [link] and this image that we are on now. All these images are within your reach with just a computerised telescope mount and a standard DSLR camera and camera lenses. You would probably need to do a small amount of DIY to make a solid connection between the mount and camera but this is very easy and I'm more than happy to provide further advice if/when you get the mount. A programable remote for your camera is also a must to allow looooooong exposures (up to 10 minutes or so). As long as you stick to focal lengths up to 300mm then you will be fine with just a mount. When you go to a telescope and longer focal lengths the list of equipment starts to build up. When you get to focal lengths over 800mm the mount alone is not enough to get perfect tracking of the stars and you need what is know as an autoguider which can lock onto a star and control the mount to keep that star perfectly in it's field of view. In this picture [link] that is the smaller telescope and bright glow on top of the main telescope.
In terms of mounts you need an equatorial mount, not an Alt/Az mount. I would be aiming for a Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro Mount [link] This is probably the cheapest "good" mount for astrophotography. Yes there are cheaper ones that you would get away with just putting a camera and lens on but if you have plans to get a telescope like an 8" reflector in the future then this is the minimum you would need. They just get more expensive from there. I spent nearly three times as much on my mount as I did on the telescope. Mine is this one [link] If you are not going to have it permanently setup in an observatory and plan to move it outside whenever you wish to use it, then you will also need to consider the physical weight of the mount and what you are comfortable moving around. They are not lite. I wouldn't like to be carrying my mount around all the time. The HEQ5 Pro is a much lighter mount.
In terms of forums I am on www.iceinspace.com.au which is more of an Australasian based forum. I know there are many NZ members on there. If you can find a local astronomy club in your area I can highly recommend joing and going along and introducing yourself and asking lots of questions. You will meet like minded people and have the opportunity to look at other peoples scopes and mounts and even try before you buy. Even if there is not a local club, then if you join Ice In Space and introduce yourself and say something like "seeking fellow NZ members" you might be able to arrange to meet with them somewhere and take a look at their equipment. You will be hard pressed to find friendlier people than amateur astronomers.
A great resource I found very useful when I was investigating my setup was this [link] book on CD. I can highly recommend picking yourself up a copy.
Hope this helps.
Cheers
Reply
:iconsilverfernn:
silverfernn Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Oh Man! And it does help! Yay! Cool!
Reply
:iconbhalstead:
bhalstead Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2012   Photographer
Only in astrophotography does a "quickie" involve 40 minutes of exposure and another 20 minutes of dark frames! Nice job nonetheless!
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
HaHa. Yeah it's all relative. :D Thank you
Reply
:icontheninja42:
theninja42 Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2012  Student Photographer
nice image but needs more exposure time but that will come with the cooler nights
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks mate :D Yeah totally agree about more time needed, but pretty happy with this for 40 minutes worth.
Reply
:iconsyndyne:
Syndyne Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012
What an amazing image! Those colours are spectacular. Beautiful work as always Greg. :clap:
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you so much Shaun :D Don't know why it took me so long to image this section of sky.
Reply
:iconjon-rista:
jon-rista Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Amazing shot! I really love the depth of color...rather surprising for 120-second shots from a 90mm lens!! (I'd have expected more star trailing.) Out of curiosity, what was the light pollution like? Were you in a very dark area? I've been trying to image Orion's Belt and Sword area lately, using DSS to stack, and have not been having much luck...very low saturation for all the nebula around (barely getting a slightly red smudge for Horse Head.) Seeing this has reinspired me to try again, although I may have to change my tactics.
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you very much :D No star trailing because my camera was mounted on the top of my computerised telescope mount which counters the rotation of the earth. Very dark skies. I am very lucky to live where there is little to none light pollution. What setup are you trying to image the Orion region with. Perhaps if you note me with all the details of what you have been doing I might be able to help.
Reply
:iconjon-rista:
jon-rista Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Oh, sorry...missed that you had it on a tracking mount. That explains it. :D As for setup, I don't have a tracing mount, so that limits my exposure times. I have a Canon 7D, with 16-35mm f/2.8 L II, 50mm f/1.4, and 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 L lenses. I use the 16-35mm and sometimes 50/1.4@f/2 for wide field shots, and sometimes I use the 100-400mm for nebula shots (i.e. horse head, orion nebula, etc.) The telephoto just doesn't have enough light gathering power at 400/5.6 to really get anything useful in the 10-15 seconds or so of maximum exposure before startrailing. The 16-35mm can capture some decent wide field shots up to 30-45 seconds, but as I don't have a tracking mount, its difficult to stack (horizon gets rather wonky in a stacked shot.)

I plan to get a Celestron EdgeHD w/ equitorial mount later this year. Once I have that, I should be able to pop the camera and 16-35mm on the mount, and get tracked wide field shots with ease (or use the telescope to get close-up shots.)
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
With out a tracking munt you need to stick to the 600 rule if you want to do images without noticible star trailing and DSS won't freak out on you. To do that you divide 600 by your tru focal length. The 7D is a crop sensor so you need to work out your "true focal length", if you had a full frame sensor then the true foacl length is simply the focal length of the lens. So for your 16-35mm times by 1.6 (the crop factor) equals 25.6- 56mm. 600 divided 25.6 = 23.4 (call is 23) seconds is you maximum exposure time at your widest angle. If you are using the 400mm then 400 x 1.6 = 640 600/640 means you need to do less than 1 second exposures if you want to get usable images. A tracking mount opens up a whole new world of unlimited exposures, apertures and ISO's but until you have one remember the 600 rule, take lots and lots and lots of exposures and DSS might be able to help.
Reply
:icongem-of-cali:
Gem-of-cali Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
wow that is so cool. I love your space photos.
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I'm glad you do :D Thanks
Reply
:icongem-of-cali:
Gem-of-cali Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
:icongrin--plz:
Reply
:iconsagereid:
Sagereid Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Super picture!!
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you :D
Reply
:iconleathurkatt-tftiggy:
Leathurkatt-TFTiggy Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Ah yes, Ophiuchus, the oft ignored 13th sign of the Solar Zodiac, where the sun moves through during the first half of December. It's good to see someone actually photograph this constellation. Antares is actually a Binary Red Giant system, named for the Greek God of War, Aries (who was later renamed Mars by the Romans). Yeah, I've kind of studied Astronomy since I was 8. XD
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you very much for the great feedback :D I'm glad you are into Astronomy. I'm trying to learn a bit about what I image but at the moment it's like- is it pretty? If yes, I want to image it. I had heard that about Antares being a binary. Something like 900 year orbit period?
Reply
:iconleathurkatt-tftiggy:
Leathurkatt-TFTiggy Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Something like that yeah. I actually named a Transformer character after that star system: Anterra. If you can pick up Galaxies, I know M31 has been photographed a lot, but M33 doesn't get much attention. There's an Open Cluster you could look for, M36. M101 is a good galaxy for photographing too. **smiles** As for stars, Tau Ceti might be a good star to photograph, it has a lot of debris around it so it may offer a nice cloud effect to the photo.
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks for the recommendations of things to image. I'm limited a bit by my southern hemisphere location. M31 does not rise high enough above the horizon for me to get it, so anything even further north of that I can not get. M33 is on my list. I know I can get it.
Reply
:iconleathurkatt-tftiggy:
Leathurkatt-TFTiggy Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Oh, you should be able to photograph the Alpha Centauri system then. I look forward to seeing what you managed to capture in your lens.
Reply
:iconprincevlad39:
princevlad39 Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012
piggy back?
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Yes. Camera mounted on top of NEQ6 Pro mount. Simple tracking. No auto guiding needed at this focal length.
Reply
:iconsiahposh:
siahposh Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is one the most fantastic things i`ve ever seen,lovely!!! :heart;
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I'm very glad you like it :D Thanks
Reply
:iconcorvidae65:
Corvidae65 Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012
Can't say enough good about the coolness of this image, Greg. I love nebulas--those false color images from observatories just blow my mind and this one you did is pretty close. I'm with Daniels comment 100% :clap:
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you very much John :D I'm glad you like it.
Reply
:iconcorvidae65:
Corvidae65 Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012
My pleasure Greg :highfive:
Reply
:icongautama-siddharta:
Gautama-Siddharta Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012
Wonderful what you did just with 40 min exposure on this.
Tried it twice but never had as good as a result :)
:#1:
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you very much mate :D I hope you get a chance to try it again soon.
Reply
:icondanielheydecke:
DanielHeydecke Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012
I think my heart just went flatline...and my brain offline. I give up. Be as good as you want. You just have to live with peasants like us drooling over your work.
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
It's ok. I can wipe off the drool :D Thanks mate :D
Reply
:iconcorvidae65:
Corvidae65 Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012
:lmao: Indeed!
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
:D
Reply
:iconkitger:
kitger Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
The quality of your photography makes me cry at times.

While your submissions are unbelievably amazing, they make me feel like a rank amateur.

Yet again another totally amazing image.
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you so much for the great feedback on this and my other work :D
Reply
:iconkitger:
kitger Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
You are more than worthy of any praise.

If you ever want a model to be standing in front of one of your amazing pictures. I promise to stand as still as possible :)

It would be an honour to be part of your work
Reply
:iconcapturingthenight:
CapturingTheNight Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I'll be sure to keep that in mind Kit. Thanks for the offer :D It has crossed my mind once or twice to try and do a night sky portrait shoot one night.....
Reply
:iconkitger:
kitger Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I am Melbourne based, and would be honoured to feature in your amazing art :)

Please consider this a serious offer
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×




Details

Submitted on
March 6, 2012
Image Size
247 KB
Resolution
935×667
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
2,620
Favourites
101 (who?)
Comments
44
×